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Halloween protest against 'Frankenscience'

8 November 1999
By BioNews
Appeared in BioNews 33

This has not been a good year for life-scientists. Anti-GM (genetically modified) activists dressed as genetically engineered monsters took part in Halloween celebrations in New York and Washington D.C. to protest against what they call 'Frankenscience'.

The Campaign for Responsible Transplantation were out in force on the streets of New York's Greenwich Village during the famous night-time Halloween Parade. They had created a four metre tall puppet of a mad scientist who wore a dollar sign tie clip and clutched a model of a pig-human hybrid. A number of 'hybrid attendants' wearing pig snouts danced around with signs warning of the dangers of xenotransplantation. The director of the campaign said that Halloween costumes seemed appropriate because 'it's a very ghoulish technology'.

In Washington D.C., Friends of the Earth marched to a local branch of Safeways, wearing Frankenstein masks and accompanied by a 'Gene Beast' who the campaigners hope will bring attention to the genetically modified strawberries that contain a gene for an antifreeze protein taken from the arctic flounder.

SOURCES & REFERENCES
Monster protest against Frankenscience
New Scientist |  6 November 1999
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20 August 2012 - by John Brinsley 
With the term 'Frankenstein' having become synonymous with 'mad scientists' who 'play God', and its status as the go-to criticism against any new technology that threatens to interfere with what is deemed 'natural', Shelley's story is as relevant today as ever it was. Indeed, what was once considered so morally abhorrent that it formed the fabric of horror has, with recombinant DNA, IVF, organ donation and embryonic stem cells to name but a few, been realised today several times over...
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