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Page URL: https://www.bionews.org.uk/zaramahmoud

Dr Zara Mahmoud

Dr Zara Mahmoud was previously a Volunteer Writer at BioNews, and is also a researcher and science communicator. She runs Sciencebuz, a resource aimed primarily at A-level students, and she has written for lay publications including Planet Science and Urban Times and specialist publications including the journals Biomaterials, Biophysical Journal, Chemical Society Reviews and Faraday Discussions. She has worked as an Ambassador for the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Network and for the Royal Society of Chemistry's ChemNet network, and she has also worked on science communication projects with Bristol University's ChemLabS and Research Councils UK's Researchers in Residence. She has a PhD in medical microbiology, and has worked as a postdoctoral associate in synthetic biology. Her interests include biochemistry, genetics, nanotechnology and tissue engineering. She tweets as @Sciencebuz


BioNews Review articles written by Dr Zara Mahmoud:
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Podcast Review: The World of Top (Genetics) Models
18 June 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
The top models featured in the latest Naked Genetics podcast are not the kind that grace the runway – they're the ones that grace our laboratories, providing valuable clues about conditions like Alzheimer's, viral infections and plant diseases... [Read More]

BioNews News articles written by Dr Zara Mahmoud:
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Quadruple DNA helix found in human cells
28 January 2013 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
Scientists have for the first time shown the existence of a new structural form of DNA, called G-quadruplex DNA, in human cells.... [Read More]
Genetic similarities found between ovarian and breast cancers
1 October 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
Scientists have found molecular similarities between a subtype of breast cancer and a hard-to-treat form of ovarian cancer... [Read More]
Gene affecting breathing may be linked to 'cot death'
10 September 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
US researchers have identified the gene, Atoh1, as vital in mice for their ability to recognise dangerous levels of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream.
Ten new gene links bolster understanding of type 2 diabetes
20 August 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
A large-scale statistical analysis of DNA from nearly 150,000 people of European descent has identified ten new regions of DNA that may help us understand the biological processes linked to glucose metabolism and insulin production in type 2 diabetes.... [Read More]
Aggressive brain cancer linked to gene fusion
30 July 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
Some cases of glioblastoma - a particularly aggressive form of brain cancer - may be due a genetic mutation where two separate genes fuse into one, scientists report... [Read More]
Gene test may reduce unnecessary thyroid surgeries
2 July 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
A test which screens for levels of gene expression may help reduce the number of patients with benign thyroid cancer who are put forward for unnecessary surgery... [Read More]
The root of the problem: clues about male pattern baldness
26 March 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
New treatments for male pattern baldness could be on the way, as scientists identify a protein they believe inhibits growth of hair follicles... [Read More]
Gene passed from father to son added to list of heart disease risks
13 February 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
A sixth of men have a genetic variant which could increase their risk of heart disease by up to 56 percent, according to a recent study... [Read More]
Two RNA studies give clues to neurodegeneration
23 January 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
Two independent studies have suggested new targets for treating neurodegenerative diseases... [Read More]
Desktop machine can sequence a genome in one day for £650
16 January 2012 - by Dr Zara Mahmoud
A US biotechnology firm has unveiled an automated desktop DNA sequencer that can decode the sequence of the human genome in one day for as little as $1,000 (£650). Given its first public viewing at a consumer electronics show in Las Vegas, Life Technologies Corporation's Ion Proton sequencer uses microchips similar to those found in digital cameras... [Read More]