Page URL: https://www.bionews.org.uk/page_95089

Google partners with Broad Institute on genome analysis

29 June 2015
Appeared in BioNews 808

Genome  analysis software developed by the Broad Institute is now available in cloud form to users of Google's online genetic data storage services.

The move is the first step in a partnership between the Institute and the internet giant, which will see the two develop computing infrastructure to support the analysis and storage of genetic data produced in research.

Since last week, the Broad Institute's Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) software has been available to certain users of Google Genomics - an online service where large amounts of genetic information can be stored and analysed 'in the cloud'.

The GATK software provides a variety of tools to analyse genomes, such as identifying variations between the genetic codes of different people. It is already available for free to research institutions and non-profit organisations and can be licensed for businesses.

Now that it is available through Google Genomics, customers can effectively use the software via high-powered computers maintained by Google and accessed over the internet, rather than on local computers.

Eric Banks, director of data science and data engineering at the Broad Institute, told GenomeWeb, 'The significant hardware requirements for running the GATK at scale may make it difficult for smaller research laboratories that lack dedicated compute infrastructure. But with GATK in the cloud, virtually anyone with an account can access it.'

This partnership will be seen as an advantage for Google as it and other technology companies, such as Amazon and Microsoft, compete for dominance in the emerging market of storing and analysing human genetic data online. This industry is expected to be worth $1 billion by 2018.

Modern genome studies generate huge amounts of data, with the Broad Institute saying that, in October 2014, it completed the sequence of a human genome every 32 minutes.

To date, GATK has been downloaded 20,000 times, according to Broad Institute chief operating officer Samantha Singer, and it will continue to be available directly from the Broad Institute.

SOURCES & REFERENCES
Broad Institute, Google Genomics combine bioinformatics and computing expertise to expand access to research tools
MIT Broad Institute (press release) |  23 June 2015
Broad Institute, Google Genomics to Offer Cloud-based GATK, Other Genomic Data Analysis Services
GenomeWeb |  24 June 2015
Google, Broad Institute Launch Genomic Data Partnership
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News |  25 June 2015
Google Genomics adds Broad Institute's DNA analysis toolkit
Reuters |  24 June 2015
Google wins a round in fight to lead medical research into the cloud
San Francisco Business Times |  25 June 2015
RELATED ARTICLES FROM THE BIONEWS ARCHIVE
5 October 2015 - by Terry Vrijenhoek 
A recent case in the Netherlands, in which a young woman got hereditary breast cancer because she was unaware that her deceased aunt had a breast cancer gene, has sparked a debate in the country over who is responsible for passing on such information - patients or doctors...
5 October 2015 - by Dr Rosie Gilchrist 
An international team of scientists from the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium has created the world's largest catalogue of genomic differences among humans...
21 September 2015 - by Dr Nicoletta Charolidi 
The first findings from the UK10K project, the largest population genome sequencing effort to date, have been made available to worldwide researchers...
13 July 2015 - by Chris Baldacci 
Scientists have warned that the world of genomics is headed for a data bottleneck...
22 June 2015 - by Professor Anneke Lucassen and Dr Emma Baple 
The gap between discovering genomic contributions to diseases and testing an individual’s genome for personal, actionable, information about health is wider than the current discourse on genomics might suggest...
1 June 2015 - by Sandy Starr 
In our recent poll on BioNews, we asked you for your views on the benefits and risks of participating in the 100,000 Genomes Project...
18 May 2015 - by Ari Haque 
Patents for the gene-editing technology, CRISPR/Cas9, are the subject of a dispute between scientists at University of California, Berkeley and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard....
30 March 2015 - by Kirsty Oswald 
Genomics England has announced a new consortium that will see it share data from the 100,000 Genomes Project with major industry players...
18 November 2014 - by Chris Baldacci 
Google has announced that it will offer storage and analysis of genome sequencing data...
HAVE YOUR SAY
Log in to add a Comment.

By posting a comment you agree to abide by the BioNews terms and conditions


Syndicate this story - click here to enquire about using this story.