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Obituary: Professor David Healy

6 June 2012
Appeared in BioNews 659
It is with great sadness that the International Federation of Fertility Societies (IFFS) announces the death of Professor David Healy, president of the Federation, who passed away on 25 May 2012, after a period of illness.

Professor Healy graduated from Monash University, Australia, where he received the senior medical staff prize in 1973. He completed a PhD at Monash in 1977, and then worked at the Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne before completing his Obstetrics and Gynaecology specialty training at the National Institutes of Health, USA, and at Edinburgh, Scotland.

David Healy became a professor of the Monash University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in 1990 and its chairman in 1994. Between 1991 and 1994 he served as the associate clinical dean of the Monash University Faculty of Medicine. He was the Head of the Reproductive Medicine Clinic from 1997. In 2002 Professor Healy became the chair of the Australian University Departments of Obstetrics & Gynaecology and was awarded an honorary fellowship of the Royal College for his many achievements.

He was a fine teacher, and a great believer in encouraging younger talent. Despite his busy clinical commitments, he continued a very active research interest, publishing 255 research articles, 78 book chapters, and editing 8 books.

Professor Healy served on boards of many learned societies, both nationally and internationally but was especially proud of his election to the Presidency of the IFFS - the first Australian to hold this position.

David Healy served the IFFS in many ways. He was chair of the Industry Committee from 2001 to 2010, and Fertility Society of Australia representative to the IFFS board of directors from 2004 to 2007. He became president-elect in 2007, and acceded to the role of president at the 2010 World Congress on Fertility and Sterility in Munich in 2010. During his time as an executive of the board he took particular care in emphasising the mission of the IFFS 'to stimulate basic and clinical research, disseminate education, and encourage superior clinical care of patients in infertility and reproductive medicine worldwide'. His passing represents a great personal and professional loss to the IFFS, its board, its members, and those who knew him.

The IFFS extends its condolences to Professor Healy's family, especially his children Ross and Meagan.

David Healy will be succeeded as president of the IFFS by president-elect, Joe-Leigh Simpson (New York).
SOURCES & REFERENCES
International Federation of Fertility Societies
IFFS |  28 July 2021
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