Help others to be mothers - please sign and share the Progress Educational Trust's petition, calling on the UK Government to #ExtendTheLimit on social egg freezing
Page URL: https://www.bionews.org.uk/page_147901

Fresh donor eggs better for IVF than frozen

17 February 2020
Appeared in BioNews 1035

Using fresh donated eggs for IVF leads to slightly better birth outcomes than frozen, according to the largest comparison of donor egg IVF cycles to date.

Data from nearly 37,000 IVF cycles in the US between 2012 and 2015 showed that fresh eggs resulted in a slightly greater chance of a good birth outcome, which the researchers defined as a single, non-premature baby delivered at a healthy birth weight.

'Our study found that the odds of a good birth outcome were less with frozen than with fresh, but it was a small difference', says lead author Dr Jennifer Eaton, of Duke Fertility Centre in North Carolina.

When the quality of fertilised eggs and the age of both mother and donor were taken into account, the team found that fresh eggs led to good birth outcomes in 24 percent of cycles compared to 22 percent of the cycles with frozen eggs. 

The rates of embryo implantation, pregnancy and live birth were all significantly higher among the women using fresh eggs compared to frozen, but fresh eggs also led to a 37 percent higher chance of multiple births, which could pose greater risk for both mothers and babies.

Donor eggs are often used for older women or women who have a decreased egg supply. This has led to an increased demand for frozen donor eggs which are a cheaper and faster option than fresh donor eggs. But it was previously unknown which type provides the best birth outcomes.

Although this study is the first to show an advantage of fresh donor eggs over frozen, the researchers say that doctors should take the other benefits of using frozen eggs into account when discussing the best option with patients.

'Given that frozen eggs have many benefits such as ease, cost, and speed, the decision to use fresh or frozen donor eggs should be made on an individual basis after consultation with a physician', said Dr Eaton.

The study was published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

SOURCES & REFERENCES
Analysis: use of fresh donor eggs in IVF has small advantage in birth outcomes
Duke University School of Medicine |  10 February 2020
Fresh donor egg better than frozen for IVF: study
US News |  13 February 2020
Fresh donor eggs better for IVF than frozen eggs
UPI |  14 February 2020
Fresh Eggs for IVF offer slightly better birth outcomes
Futurity |  7 February 2020
Prevalence of a Good Perinatal Outcome With Cryopreserved Compared With Fresh Donor Oocytes
Obstetrics & Gynecology |  6 February 2020
RELATED ARTICLES FROM THE BIONEWS ARCHIVE
11 May 2020 - by Jennifer Frosch 
Women who used fertility treatment to conceive their first child have a good chance of having a second child the same way, according to a new study...
24 February 2020 - by Dr Rosie Gilchrist 
Children conceived by assisted reproductive technologies, such as IVF, are at a slightly higher risk of dying within the first year of life than children conceived naturally, according to a recent study in Sweden...
27 January 2020 - by Annabel Slater 
The legislation surrounding gamete freezing is complicated and difficult to comprehend, even for people with law degrees. The Progress Educational Trust's latest event 'Frozen Fertility: The Challenges of Storing Eggs, Sperm and Embryos', held at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, set out to explore the current state of play...
12 January 2020 - by Professor Marcia C. Inhorn 
Women are electing to collect and freeze their eggs in the hope of preserving fertility for the future...
4 November 2019 - by Georgia Everett 
The Progress Educational Trust (PET) has launched its #ExtendTheLimit campaign, asking the UK public to sign an online petition requiring Parliament to address the law on egg freezing time limits...
22 July 2019 - by Bernie Owusu-Yaw 
The Sista Collective is the 'BBC's first homegrown podcast led and hosted by black British women'. Journalist Jessie Aru-Phillips is joined by TV presenter Scarlett Douglas and model Eunice Olumide to discuss egg freezing, fertility and IVF through the lens of women of colour...
HAVE YOUR SAY
Log in to add a Comment.

By posting a comment you agree to abide by the BioNews terms and conditions


Syndicate this story - click here to enquire about using this story.