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Genetic test for child cancer patients

04 April 2016

By Dr James Heather

Appeared in BioNews 845

Hospitals around the UK are going to start examining the DNA of tumour cells from paediatric cancer patients in a pilot study starting later this year. The study organisers hope that genetic testing, planned for around 400 patients in 21 hospitals, will give greater insight into the nature of the patients' cancers, allowing doctors to prescribe better-targeted treatments.

Researchers at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and the Royal Marsden Hospital in London collaborated to design the test which concentrates on 81 genes that are often found to have mutated in tumour cells and affect the development of the disease.

Using genetic tests to better tailor treatments to the individual patient, or personalised medicine, is becoming increasingly commonplace in adult medicine. The pilot study organisers say that the approach could be especially useful for children, as the results of genetic testing can be used to help enrol young patients into the most appropriate clinical trials. The rarity of childhood cancer means that finding an appropriate clinical trial for a patient is more difficult for children than for adults.

The test was developed with funding from the charity Christopher's Smile, which was set up by two parents whose five-year-old son died from an aggressive brain tumour, after an arduous cycle of treatments with a great deal of side-effects.

'When our son died in 2008 there was no biological information available to clinicians about individual children's tumours,' said Karen Capel, Christopher's mother and a trustee of the charity. 'Our aim is that it will change the landscape for children and open doors to potential new trials with new treatments, benefiting those children who receive the worst prognosis.'

The study is due to last around two years, and will investigate samples from children aged 14 and under, focusing on samples from patients with solid tumours only, as cancers of the blood are relatively easily treatable. If successful, the researchers hope that the test will be rolled out to all eligible children.

Professor Louis Chesler, the lead researcher on the study who works at both the ICR and the Royal Marsden, said: 'A more comprehensive and structured approach to genetic testing to match children with cancer to specific targeted treatments could be an incredibly important step towards increasing survival.'

RELATED ARTICLES FROM THE BIONEWS ARCHIVE

02 October 2017 - by Dr Molly Godfrey 
Deadly childhood brain tumours are highly diverse and can be divided into 10 different subtypes, according to new research...
13 June 2016 - by Rachel Reeves 
Genetic sequencing leading to targeted treatment significantly improves cancer patient outcomes in early-stage clinical trials, according to a study...

21 March 2016 - by Hannah Somers 
Scientists say they have been able to detect multiple diseases, including pancreatic cancer, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, by analysing fragments of DNA in the bloodstream...
21 March 2016 - by Helen Robertson 
'Personalised medicine' is a term that's being increasingly used to describe the future of cancer treatment. But are we ready for the genomics revolution that comes with it?...
07 March 2016 - by Dr Molly Godfrey 
Scientists have identified a method by which all the cells in a tumour could potentially be recognised and eradicated by the patient's own immune system...
18 January 2016 - by Dr Molly Godfrey 
Two girls have become the first children to be diagnosed with rare genetic conditions through the 100,000 Genomes Project – the NHS DNA-sequencing initiative...
28 September 2015 - by Kirsty Oswald 
NHS England's national medical director, Sir Bruce Keogh, has outlined how the organisation's approach to personalised medicine will develop over the coming years and expand beyond the work of the 100,000 Genomes Project...

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CROSSING FRONTIERS

Public Conference
London
8 December 2017

Speakers include

Professor Azim Surani

Professor Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz

Professor Robin Lovell-Badge

Sally Cheshire

Professor Guido Pennings

Katherine Littler

Professor Allan Pacey

Dr Sue Avery

Professor Richard Anderson

Dr Elizabeth Garner

Dr Andy Greenfield

Dr Anna Smajdor

Dr Henry Malter

Vivienne Parry

Dr Helen O'Neill

Dr César Palacios-González

Philippa Taylor

Fiona Fox

Sarah Norcross

Sandy Starr


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