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The Fertility Show

Glossary

CVS (chorionic villus sampling)

CVS (chorionic villus sampling) is a test carried usually carried out between the 11th and 14th week of pregnancy, in which a few cells of the placenta are removed for biochemical or genetic testing. This is most commonly to check an unborn baby for disorders such as Down’s syndrome and rarer specific inherited disorders.



Articles using this Glossary Item

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Radio Review: One to One - Jane Hill meets Caroline Harding

05 June 2017 - by Arit Udoh

The first of two episodes of the One-to-One programme about people from families affected by genetic diseases: exploring the emotional impact of a family member's diagnosis and how relatives decide whether or not to find out if the condition will also affect them... [Read More]

Down's syndrome: NIPT in the bud?

03 October 2016 - by Victoria Woodham

The introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing in the NHS screening programme for pregnant women may seem like a no-brainer, but it is based on outdated ideas of what life is like for people with Down's syndrome and their families... [Read More]

Reassurance for mothers over mosaic aneuploidy in CVS

03 May 2016 - by Professor Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz

Although our recent findings on the fate of aneuploid cells in mosaic embryos have indeed been somewhat misrepresented in the press, our findings may still constitute a strand of hope for mothers who have had early test results showing mosaic aneuploidy... [Read More]

Abnormal fetuses are highly unlikely to heal themselves

18 April 2016 - by Professor Caroline Ogilvie

Press coverage of a recent study on mouse embryos speculates that termination of human pregnancies diagnosed with aneuploidy (a family of conditions including Down's syndrome) at prenatal diagnosis could be unnecessary, due to the ability of the fetus to 'heal itself'. In fact, the paper's findings are not relevant to aneuploidy detected at prenatal diagnosis... [Read More]

Mouse study raises debate over embryo viability testing

04 April 2016 - by Helen Robertson

The presence of genetic abnormalities in cells taken from the placenta at the early stages of pregnancy does not necessarily mean that a baby will be born with a genetic disorder, a study in mice suggests.... [Read More]

HFEA releases 2014 incidents report

21 September 2015 - by Dr Mary Yarwood

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has released its second annual report into adverse incidents at fertility clinics in the UK, showing a slight reduction in the overall number of reported problems following fertility treatment... [Read More]

Maternal blood test for Down's syndrome to be trialled in UK

04 November 2013 - by María Victoria Rivas Llanos

A new method for prenatal testing for Down's syndrome will be tried out at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (GOSH), London.... [Read More]

Non-invasive prenatal test as good as invasive methods, say scientists

14 January 2013 - by Dr Daniel Grimes

US biotech company Verinata Health has reported sequencing fetal DNA taken from pregnant women's blood to test for genetic abnormalities... [Read More]

Improved prenatal test may better detect genetic diseases

10 December 2012 - by Dr Lux Fatimathas

More sensitive prenatal testing of fetal DNA could improve the detection of genetic diseases, studies find... [Read More]

Non-invasive prenatal test for at-risk mothers recommended by US medical society

26 November 2012 - by Dr Lux Fatimathas

Non-invasive pre-natal screening for certain abnormalities in fetal chromosomes should be offered to at-risks mothers, recommends the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists... [Read More]

Fetal genome sequenced using only a blood sample from the mother

09 July 2012 - by Dr Lux Fatimathas

US researchers have for the first time sequenced the genome of a fetus using only a blood sample from the mother. It is hoped this new form of non-invasive sampling could allow doctors to screen for a range of genetic diseases prenatally, with minimal risk to the fetus... [Read More]

Reflections on the ethical debate surrounding non-invasive prenatal genetic diagnosis

12 September 2011 - by Professor Vardit Ravitsky

An up-and-coming technology will soon allow genetic testing of a fetus with a simple maternal blood test early in the first trimester of the pregnancy by isolating cell-free fetal DNA in the mother's plasma. Currently, obtaining reliable diagnostic genetic information requires invasive testing with Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis. Both carry a risk of miscarriage and are performed between weeks 10 and 20 of the pregnancy... [Read More]

Maternal test for Down's syndrome may reduce need for invasive diagnosis

17 January 2011 - by Owen Clark

New research suggests that Down's syndrome could be detected using genetic screening, avoiding the need for invasive detection procedures.... [Read More]

World-famous PGD expert dies, aged 65

03 August 2009 - by Ailsa Stevens

Renowned fertility expert Dr. Yury Verlinsky died from colon cancer at the age of 65 on 16th July 2009. He was famous for pioneering the development preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in the 90's, a technique which allows couples with a serious inherited disease in the family to screen their embryos against the condition. The technique has been used by families at risk of some 200 genetic disorders, including haemophilia, sickle cell anaemia, muscular dystrophy, Tay-Sachs disease, cystic... [Read More]

Setback for Down syndrome prenatal blood test

12 May 2009 - by Ben Jones

The effectiveness of a prenatal test for Down syndrome has been thrown into doubt after its developers, Sequenom, admitted that study data had been 'mishandled' by its employees. The company, which had been producing apparently strong results in house for its DNA and RNA blood testing products... [Read More]

Expert recommendations for earlier, safer prenatal diagnosis

16 February 2009 - by Dr Philippa Brice

Cell-free fetal nucleic acids - DNA or the related molecule RNA - are present in the blood. As has previously been reviewed, the discovery that a small proportion of the cell-free nucleic acids in the mother's blood during pregnancy actually comes from the fetus paved the way for new techniques to exploit... [Read More]

New blood test for fetal genetic disease shows promise

08 December 2008 - by Evelyn Harvey

By Evelyn Harvey: A new method for early detection of genetic diseases in unborn babies using a simple blood test can detect the inherited condition beta-thalassemia, according to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Although the technique, which analyses cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA) present... [Read More]

Non-invasive prenatal test for Down's syndrome developed

13 October 2008 - by Lorna Stewart

Scientists at Stanford University in California, US have developed a new non-invasive prenatal test for Down's syndrome. Stephen Quake and colleagues successfully identified presence and absence of fetal chromosomal abnormality in 18 pregnant women from maternal blood samples. The work is published this month in the journal... [Read More]

Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis using cell-free fetal DNA: implications for parents

15 September 2008 - by Jane Fisher

Antenatal Results and Choices (ARC) is the only UK charity providing non-directive information and support to parents before, during and after antenatal testing and when an abnormality is diagnosed in an unborn baby. We have 20 years' experience of talking to parents on our National Helpline on all aspects of... [Read More]

Progress in free fetal DNA (ffDNA)-based prenatal tests

15 September 2008 - by Tessa Homfray

The holy grail of prenatal diagnosis has been the identification of chromosome and single gene abnormalities through maternal blood sampling. This would allow safe accurate prenatal diagnosis, requiring much lower operator skills, and automation is potentially possible, making it cost-effective. In contrast, standard prenatal screening involves ultrasound and biochemical risk... [Read More]

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Events using this Glossary Item

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Published by the Progress Educational Trust

CROSSING FRONTIERS

Moving the Boundaries of Human Reproduction

Public Conference
London
8 December 2017

Speakers include

Professor Azim Surani

Professor Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz

Professor Robin Lovell-Badge

Sally Cheshire

Professor Guido Pennings

Katherine Littler

Professor Allan Pacey

Dr Sue Avery

Professor Richard Anderson

Dr Elizabeth Garner

Dr Jacques Cohen

Dr Anna Smajdor

Dr Andy Greenfield

Vivienne Parry

Dr Helen O'Neill

Dr César Palacios-González

Philippa Taylor

Fiona Fox

Sarah Norcross


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